LG Optimus VU Complete Review

LG Optimus VU Complete Review

Unlike the galaxy note. Which still maintains a 16:9 aspect ratio, the Optimus Vu’s screen sports an aspect ratio of 4:3. Any sense of ergonomics goes for a toss when you pack a 5-inch screen with this aspect ratio. The Vu is terribly uncomfortable to hold as you have to stretch your hand for a good grip. You can pretty much forget about one handed usage here as there’s always the fear of you dropping it. It also feels really strange in your pocket, and we would not be surprised if the corners were to bore holes in your pants overtime. It’s quite a heavy phone too at 168gm, which adds to the discomfort. The 5-inch HD-IPS display surprisingly does not have HD resolution. A resolution of 1024×768 pixels on such a large screen is not the best when you compare it to the 4X HD from LG, which had a 4.7 inch HD screen.

Like many of the newer handsets, the Optimus Vu comes with Android 4.0.4 and LG’s own Optimus UI. The UI is similar to what we saw on the 4X HD; it is functional and simple to use. The new lock-screen gets a cool little animation and you can unlock it by sliding your finger anywhere on the screen. The toggle switches in the notification bar are a nice touch and you can edit, add and replace them. The colourful icon set and layout of the menu look an awful lot like Samsungs TouchWiz UI.

The UI is very smooth with hardly any lags or slowdowns. The Vu is powered by an Nvidia Tegra 3SoC, so you get four CPU cores and twelve GPU cores. This makes it ideal for gaming and you can really take advantages of some of the games that are optimized for the Tegra 3SoC, like Dead Trigger. Speaking of apps, most of them will overflow beyond the screen limits. To compensate for this, LG has included an app that automatically fits the apps to the aspect VU. This means you will have to deal with unnecessary black bars around the app, which does not make for the best of experience.

LG Optimus VU Complete Review

The music player is quite simple and straight forward to use. Your music can be sorted according to the usual categories ,including folder view. There is Dolby Mobile for audio enhancement, which can be toggled on or off. This makes quite a bit of difference in the audio quality, but only works when the headphones are connected. The speaker around the back is quite loud for alerts as well as listening to music or watching a movie.

You get an 8MP shooter, similar to the one on the 4X HD, along with an LED flash. The levels of detail captured is good but not great. Despite the large size of the phone ,LG has fitted the Vu with just a 2080mAh battery. This gives it a strictly average battery life.With a price tag $644 ,the LG Optimus Vu is one expensive phone . Quite frankly, does not make sense at all. You can find it online $600, but this is still quite expensive.

Unlike the galaxy note. Which still maintains a 16:9 aspect ratio, the Optimus Vu’s screen sports an aspect ratio of 4:3. Any sense of ergonomics goes for a toss when you pack a 5-inch screen with this aspect ratio. The Vu is terribly uncomfortable to hold as you have to stretch your hand for a good grip. You can pretty much forget about one handed usage here as there’s always the fear of you dropping it. It also feels really strange in your pocket, and we would not be surprised if the corners were to bore holes in your pants overtime. It’s quite a heavy phone too at 168gm, which adds to the discomfort. The 5-inch HD-IPS display surprisingly does not have HD resolution. A resolution of 1024×768 pixels on such a large screen is not the best when you compare it to the 4X HD from LG, which had a 4.7 inch HD screen. Like many of the newer handsets, the Optimus Vu comes with Android 4.0.4 and LG’s own Optimus UI. The UI is similar to what we saw on the 4X HD; it is functional and simple to use. The new lock-screen gets a cool little animation and you can unlock it by sliding your finger anywhere on the screen. The toggle switches in the notification bar are a nice touch and you can edit, add and replace them. The colourful icon set and layout of the menu look an awful lot like Samsungs TouchWiz UI. The UI is very smooth with hardly any lags or slowdowns. The Vu is powered by an Nvidia Tegra 3SoC, so you get four CPU cores and twelve GPU cores. This makes it ideal for gaming and you can really take advantages of some of the games that are optimized for the Tegra 3SoC, like Dead Trigger. Speaking of apps, most of them will overflow beyond the screen limits. To compensate for this, LG has included an app that automatically fits the apps to the aspect VU. This means you will have to deal with unnecessary black bars around the app, which does not make for the best of experience. The music player is quite simple and straight forward to use. Your music can be sorted according to the usual categories ,including folder view. There is Dolby Mobile for audio enhancement, which can be toggled on or off. This makes quite a bit of difference in the audio quality, but only works when the headphones are connected. The speaker around the back is quite loud for alerts as well as listening to music or watching a movie. You get an 8MP shooter, similar to the one on the 4X HD, along with an LED flash. The levels of detail captured is good but not great. Despite the large size of the phone ,LG has fitted the Vu with just a 2080mAh battery. This gives it a strictly average battery life.With a price tag $644 ,the LG Optimus Vu is one expensive…

Review Overview

Design - 5.8
Performance - 5.8
Display Quality - 7.3
Sound Quality - 5.2
Features - 8.1
Battery Life - 6.8
Money Value - 6.6

6.5

Average

We will consider the feedbacks from users who are using the products for the accuracy of the product review.  You Can Check How We View The Rating Points.

User Rating: 2.65 ( 2 votes)
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